THERMODYNAMICALLY “POSSIBLE”?
© Timothy Wallace. All Rights Reserved.
Step Fantasy World Real World
1 The concept of macro-evolution is “not challenged” by the Second Law of Thermodynamics. The concept of spontaneously levitating boulders is “not challenged” by the Second Law of Thermodynamics. The concept of heavier-than-air powered flight is “not challenged” by the Second Law of Thermodynamics.
2 Therefore the concept of macro-evolution must be considered “thermodynamically viable” in spite of the fact that it has not been observed. Therefore the concept of spontaneously levitating boulders must be considered “thermodynamically viable” in spite of the fact that it has not been observed. The concept of heavier-than-air powered flight is tentatively considered “thermodynamically viable” in spite of the fact that it has not been observed.
3 The “scientist” is “excused” from presenting the detailed processes and mechanisms through which the the entropy changes take place allowing macro-evolution to take place. The “scientist” likewise need not be required to present the detailed processes and mechanisms through which the the entropy changes take place allowing the spontaneous levitation of boulders to take place. The scientist formulates and presents the detailed processes and mechanisms through which the entropy changes can take place allowing for heavier-than-air powered flight.
4 Macro-evolution is popularly touted as “thermodynamically viable” with no genuine substantiation via the scientific process. The spontaneous levitation of boulders is entitled to similar popular acceptance as “thermodynamically viable” with no genuine substantiation via the scientific process. Through observation, measurement, and repetition, the scientist/engineer demonstrates the technical viability of heavier-than-air powered flight.  Science has done its job.
5 The scientific process has been spurned and mocked. The scientific process has been spurned and mocked. The scientific process has been allowed to do its job.

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